Recent Storm Damage Posts

Eta strengthens to hurricane again; Northeast Florida preps for impact

11/11/2020 (Permalink)

map showing the projected path of Hurricane Eta as is extends to North Florida and South Georgia Source: National Weather Service & National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Just when we thought hurricane season was over, the Jacksonville area is now looking for a November impact from Hurricane Eta. Our area will begin to feel the effects overnight into Thursday morning.

The Following is a Weather Impact Overview for the Jacksonville Area From the National Weather Service: 

  • Tropical Storm Eta Forecast to move into North Central and Northeast FL Thursday-Thursday evening
  • Tropical Storm Warnings and Watches Issued for Portions of Northeast FL
  • Additional Watches and Warnings May Need to be Issued Today
  • Slight Risk of Excessive Rainfall Thursday-Thursday evening.
  • High Rip Current Risk Today
  • Rough surf and life –threatening rip currents. It is highly recommended to remain out of the water
  • Small Craft Advisory In Effect For Most of the Coastal Waters

 Hopefully this storm will not cause major damages, but if you suffer water damage or flooding, please call SERVPRO of Fernandina Beach/Jacksonville Northeast at 904.729.2401.

Sign Up for Emergency Storm Alerts in Nassau and Duval Counties

9/2/2020 (Permalink)

We are entering peak hurricane season in Jacksonville and Northeast Florida. Here is a tip to help keep you safe in the event of a storm.

County alert systems keep you up to date about storms and severe weather. Below we explain the alert systems available to you in Duval and Nassau counties and provide the links that allow you to sign up.  

AlertJax: Emergency Notification System in Duval County

AlertJax/Jax Ready is an emergency notification system that will call/text residents in the event of a potential or pending emergency.  It is a free service to the citizens of Duval County.  

Additionally, AlertJax provides weather warnings based on geographical location including severe weather warnings from the National Weather Service within minutes of being issued.  If you wish to register use the link below. 

Sign up for AlertJax…


Alert Nassau: Emergency Notification System in Nassau County

Keep informed about emergency conditions and other important community news by signing up for our Emergency Alert Notification System.  This Citizen Alert system provides you with critical information quickly in a variety of situations, like when circumstances require evacuations or sheltering-in-place for your neighborhood, or create unexpected road closures.  You can receive voice-recorded alerts to your choice of home, mobile, or business phones, as well as text alerts and e-mail messages. 

Sign up for Alert Nassau…

If you or someone you know suffers storm-related water damage, call SERVPRO Fernandina Beach/Jacksonville Northeast at 904.729.2401.

Jacksonville and Northeast Florida Brace for Hurricane Isaias

7/31/2020 (Permalink)

aerial photo of a hurricane Hurricane Isaias packs winds of 80 mph as it moves through the Bahamas and toward the Florida Coast.

Source: FEMA

With Hurricane Isaias churning off the coast of Florida, it’s time for residents of Jacksonville, Oceanway, River City, Yulee, Fernandina Beach and other nearby towns to prepare. That means creating an emergency kit.

Having the proper supplies on hand is key to being prepared during this year’s hurricane season, which lasts through the end of November. Keep your supplies in an easy-to-carry emergency-preparedness kit that you can use at home or take with you in case you must evacuate. 

At a minimum, you should have these basic supplies:

  • Water: one gallon per person, per day (3-day supply for evacuation, 2-week supply for home).
  • Food: non-perishable, easy-to-prepare items (3-day supply for evacuation, 2-week supply for home).
  • Flashlight.
  • Battery-powered or hand-crank radio (NOAA Weather Radio, if possible).
  • Extra batteries.
  • First aid kit.
  • Medications (7-day supply) and medical items.
  • Multi-purpose tool, like a Swiss Army knife.
  • Sanitation and personal hygiene items.
  • Copies of personal documents (medication list and pertinent medical information, proof of address, deed/lease to home, passports, birth certificates, insurance policies).
  • Cell phone with charger.
  • Family and emergency contact information.
  • Extra cash (ATMs might be inoperable).
  • Extra fuel for generator and car.

Depending on your family’s requirements, you may need to include: medical-care items, baby supplies, pet supplies and other things, such as extra car and house keys.

Additional supplies might include towels, plastic sheeting, duct tape, scissors and work gloves. This year, you’ll also want to have plenty of facial masks and hand sanitizers for protection against the coronavirus.

Resources that offer additional information on putting together emergency kits are online at
https://www.ready.gov/ and http://www.redcross.org/get-help/prepare-for-emergencies/be-red-cross-ready/get-a-kit.

Jacksonville Area Entering Peak Season for Hurricanes

7/23/2020 (Permalink)

hurricane winds blowing trees near coastline If storms impact your home or business, and you have water damage, call SERVPRO of Fernandina Beach/Jax NE at 904.729.2401.

Source: National Weather Service

Hurricane season is upon us. Meteorologists are currently tracking several storms in the Atlantic, so now is the time for residents of Jacksonville, Oceanway, River City, Yulee, Fernandina Beach and surrounding areas to brush up on their knowledge and preparations for potential bad weather. Following are some definitions of which you should be aware.

NOTE: The number of Tropical Storms and Hurricanes increases substantially in August, peaks in mid-September and decreases towards a minimum by early November. 

Tropical Depression
A tropical depression is a tropical cyclone that has maximum sustained surface winds (one-minute average) of 38 mph (33 knots) or less. 

Tropical Storm
A tropical storm is a tropical cyclone that has maximum sustained surface winds ranging from 39-73 mph (34 to 63 knots).

Hurricane
A hurricane is a tropical cyclone that has maximum sustained surface winds of 74 mph or greater (64 knots or greater).

Tropical Storm Watch
A Tropical Storm Watch is issued when Tropical Storm conditions, including winds of 39-73 mph, pose a POSSIBLE threat to a specified coastal area within 48 hours.

Tropical Storm Warning
A Tropical Storm Warning is issued when Tropical Storm conditions, including winds of 39-73 mph, are EXPECTED in a specified coastal area within 36 hours or less.

Hurricane Watch
A Hurricane Watch is issued when sustained winds of 74 mph or higher are POSSIBLE within the specified area of the Watch. Because hurricane preparedness activities become difficult once winds reach tropical storm force, the Watch is issued 48 hours in advance of the onset of tropical storm force winds.

Hurricane Warning
A Hurricane Warning is issued when sustained winds of 74 mph or higher are EXPECTED somewhere within the specified area of the Warning. Because hurricane preparedness activities become difficult once winds reach tropical storm force, the Warning is issued 36 hours in advance of the onset of tropical storm force winds.

NOTE: A Hurricane Warning can remain in effect when dangerously high water or a combination of dangerously high water and exceptionally high waves continues...even if the winds have subsided below hurricane intensity.

Colorado State University’s (CSU) hurricane forecast predicts 20 named storms

7/15/2020 (Permalink)

aerial photo of a hurricane CSU researchers predict four hurricanes with Category 3 or higher strength this season.

Source: News4Jax

The prediction also calls 9 hurricanes, including 4 with Category 3 or higher strength

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. – The July update of the long term hurricane forecast raises the number of storms and hurricanes we expect to see.

Colorado State University (CSU) released its July update to the university’s long-term hurricane season forecast, raising the number of storms and hurricanes they expect for the 2020 season.

The original prediction from CSU already called for an above-average hurricane season, but the July update raises the number of named storms from 16 to 20 (keep in mind they’ve already named five so far), and the number of those that become hurricanes from eight to nine. The prediction now calls for four instead of three of those hurricanes to reach Category Three or higher strength.

CSU has long been a source for hurricane forecasts.

Hurricane Preparedness Week, May 3-9

5/7/2020 (Permalink)

Aerial photograph of an Atlantic hurricane. Researchers are predicting an active hurricane season this year.

Be ready for hurricane season. Today you can determine your personal hurricane risk, find out if you live in a hurricane evacuation zone, and review/update insurance policies. You can also make a list of items to replenish hurricane emergency supplies and start thinking about how you will prepare your home for the coming hurricane season. If you live in hurricane-prone areas, you are encouraged to complete these simple preparations before hurricane season begins on June 1.  Keep in mind, you may need to adjust any preparedness actions based on the latest health and safety guidelines from the CDC and your local officials.

SERVPRO of Fernandina Beach/Jacksonville Northeast can help you get your home back to normal if you suffer hurricane damage. Call us at 904.729.2401 if we can be of assistance.

Strong Storms Moving into Jacksonville Area

4/23/2020 (Permalink)

map screen showing location of tornadoes occurring in the area Please stay aware of weather conditions in your area.

What: Enhanced Risk of Severe Thunderstorms Today into Friday Morning

When: Thursday afternoon through Late Friday

Where: Southeast GA and Northeast Florida

What: Tornadoes, Damaging Wind Gusts, Hail, & Heavy Rain Possible Slight Risk of Severe Thunderstorms Friday

When: Friday Morning through Friday Afternoon/Evening

Where: Northeast Florida and parts of Southeast Georgia

 What: Tornadoes, Damaging Wind Gusts, Hail, & Heavy Rain Possible Severe Thunderstorm possible again Saturday

This system will bring rain and some strong storms into the area. The highest threat is damaging winds, locally heavy rainfall, and isolated tornadoes. Showers and storms will likely linger into early tomorrow morning in northeast Florida. A few strong storms are still possible south of I-10 through midday. Please stay informed of conditions in your area.

Researchers Predicting Active 2020 Atlantic Hurricane Season

4/6/2020 (Permalink)

Hurricane winds blowing surf on shore and blowing palm tree On top of the other challenges we are currently facing, CSU hurricane researchers are predicting a busy season. Hurricane season starts June 1.

Source: Colorado State University Hurricane Research Team

Colorado State University hurricane researchers are predicting an above-average Atlantic hurricane season in 2020, citing the likely absence of El Niño as a primary factor. Tropical and subtropical Atlantic sea surface temperatures are currently warmer than their long-term average values and are consequently also considered a factor favoring an active 2020 Atlantic hurricane season.

The tropical Pacific currently has warm neutral ENSO (El Niño-Southern Oscillation) conditions; that is, the waters are slightly warmer than normal in the eastern and central tropical Pacific. CSU currently anticipates that these waters are likely to cool relative to their long-term averages over the next several months. Consequently, they do not anticipate El Niño for the peak of the Atlantic hurricane season. El Niño tends to increase upper-level westerly winds across the Caribbean into the tropical Atlantic, tearing apart hurricanes as they try to form.

The tropical Atlantic is somewhat warmer than normal right now. Warmer-than-normal sea surface temperatures in the tropical Atlantic provide more fuel for tropical cyclone formation and intensification. They are also associated with a more unstable atmosphere as well as moister air, both of which favor organized thunderstorm activity that is necessary for hurricane development.

16 named storms

The CSU Tropical Meteorology Project team is predicting 16 named storms during the Atlantic hurricane season, which runs from June 1 to November 30. Of those, researchers expect eight to become hurricanes and four to reach major hurricane strength (Saffir/Simpson category 3-4-5) with sustained winds of 111 miles per hour or greater.

Jacksonville Area Expecting Strong Storms Tonight

2/6/2020 (Permalink)

weatherman showing weather forecast for this evening in the Jacksonville area The storm's main threats are brief heavy rain, gusty winds of 50-60 mph+, and an isolated tornado.

Source: Action News Jax

JACKSONVILLE, Florida — WHAT TO EXPECT DURING TODAY:

We are starting off Thursday mild with temperatures in the 60s. We will see partly cloudy skies this morning. More clouds will build in throughout the day. Highs will soar to the lower 80s this afternoon.

We will be near record highs (85 – 2008). A Wind Advisory will go into effect today at noon to 3 a.m. for all Jacksonville-area counties.

In addition to a windy day, a few showers are possible this afternoon for some local neighborhoods.

WHAT TO EXPECT TONIGHT:

First Alert Weather Day will go into effect tonight. A line of potentially strong to severe storms will move into the area this evening from west to east. Some schools will close early today ahead of the severe weather.

Friday’s morning commute will be mainly dry and breezy with some leftover wet roadways.

Stay safe as these strong storms move through our area. If you suffer any water damage, call SERVPRO Fernandina Beach/Jacksonville Northeast at 904.729.2401.

Latest Dorian Forecast, Local Impacts for Nassau/Duval - September 3

9/3/2019 (Permalink)

graphic showing path of Hurricane Dorian Hurricane Dorian has been downgraded to a Category 2 storm.

Source: WKOV

Jacksonville, Nassau County FL  - 

September 3, 11 AM:  The National Hurricane Center says Dorian has weakened some, now is a category 2 hurricane and making its turn northwest. The storm is growing in size and continues to bring dangerous winds and life-threatening storm surge on Grand Bahama Island. 

September 3, 8 AM:  The National Hurricane Center says Dorian is finally beginning to inch to the north and west as a powerful category 3 hurricane. A hurricane warning is in effect for St. Johns County. A tropical storm warning is in effect for Duval, Nassau and Clay County. 

A Hurricane Warning means that hurricane conditions are expected somewhere within the warning area. Preparations to protect life and property should be rushed to completion.

A Tropical Storm Warning means that tropical storm conditions are possible within the warning area within 36 hours. 

Action News Jax Chief Meteorologist Mike Buresh say Dorian will bring a wide range of conditions, from chewing up the coast to a non-event along and west of U.S. 301.  

Stay tuned for the latest information, and please stay safe. If you do have water damage call SERVPRO of Fernandina Beach/Jacksonville Northeast at 904.729.2401.

Latest Dorian Forecast, Local Impacts for Nassau/Duval  

8/30/2019 (Permalink)

Graphic showing Hurricane Dorian path. Hurricane Dorian is making its way toward the Florida coast.

Source: WKOV

Jacksonville, FL  -  August 30, 8 AM:  Dorian is now projected to make landfall early Tuesday morning with a Florida landfall as a category 4 hurricane.  A Hurricane Watch has been issued for the NW Bahamas. 

Maximum sustained winds are near 110 mph with higher gusts. Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 25 miles from the center, and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 105  miles. 

There is a little nudge south but more changes and adjustments in the days ahead.  The cone no longer includes much of SE Georgia. Action News Jax Chief Meteorologist Mike Buresh says there will still be some adjustments to the track but POSSIBLE Jacksonville/NE Fl./SE Ga. impacts (primarily Mon. into the middle of next week) & very dependent on exact location & intensity of Dorian:

* increasing & potentially deadly rip current risk at area beaches (as early as Fri. due to steady onshore flow). Always swim & surf with a "buddy" & as near a lifeguard as possible.

* rough seas & surf... some coastal flooding (accentuated by new moon phase Fri. in addition to occasional heavy rain) + above avg. tides at the coast, St. Johns River & its tributaries.

* breezy winds out of the east/southeast 10-20 mph, higher gusts.... peak wind gusts could reach 50+ mph early into the middle part of next week depending on positioning & strength of Dorian.

* several periods of heavy showers & t'storms, but it's not looking like a "washout" for the weekend.... wettest Monday & especially thereafter.

* isolated fast-moving tornadoes/waterspouts

Dorian could make landfall in Florida as Category 3 hurricane  

8/28/2019 (Permalink)

Graphic showing track and strength of Hurricane Dorian Weather experts are now predicting that Hurricane Dorian could reach Category 3 status.

Source: Action News Jax

August 28 11:05 a.m. update: Minutes after releasing the 11 a.m. update for Dorian, the National Hurricane Center updated the track to show Dorian could be a Category 3 storm -- a major hurricane -- during landfall in Florida Monday morning.

Hurricane warnings are already in effect in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands ahead of landfall.

The First Alert Weather Center says all indications show by this Labor Day weekend, a
powerful hurricane will be near Florida or the southeastern coast of the United States.

Jacksonville Mayor Curry said in an 11:15 a.m. briefing that the city is still two days away from making any decisions on evacuations.

He said anyone who lives in a mobile home should start thinking about evacuation plans today.

Dorian's updated track shows winds are up to 70 mph. It is forecast to become a major hurricane north of the Bahamas on Sunday morning before landfall Monday morning along the east coast of Florida.

 We at SERVPRO of Fernandina Beach/Jacksonville Northeast urge you to stay informed about this potentially dangerous storm.

Preparing for Flooding

8/22/2019 (Permalink)

Some ingredients in an emergency kit, including bottled water, flashlight, extra batteries, and phone charger. With hurricane season here, make sure you have your emergency kit ready!

Flooding can happen fast in many environments. The American Red Cross recommends having the following list of items packed and ready to go in the event of an evacuation due to flooding.

  • Water – 3+ day supply; one gallon per person per day
  • Food – 3+ day supply of non-perishable, easy-to-prepare food
  • Flashlight
  • Battery-powered or hand-crank radio (NOAA Weather Radio, if possible)
  • Extra batteries
  • First Aid kit
  • Medications (7-day supply) and medical items (hearing aids with extra batteries) glasses, contact lenses, syringes, cane)
  • Multi-purpose tool
  • Sanitation/personal hygiene items
  • Copies of personal documents (medication list and pertinent medical information, deed/lease to home, birth certificates, insurance policies)
  • Cell phone with chargers
  • Family and emergency contacts
  • Extra cash
  • Emergency blanket
  • Map(s) of the area
  • Baby supplies (bottles, formula, baby food, diapers)
  • Pet supplies (collar, leash, ID, food, carrier, bowl)
  • Tools/supplies for securing your home
  • Extra set of car keys and house keys
  • Extra clothing, hat and sturdy shoes
  • Rain gear
  • Insect repellent and sunscreen
  • Camera for photos of damage

If you have flooding or water damage, call SERVPRO of Fernandina Beach/Jacksonville Northeast at 904.729.2401. 

Have You Signed Up for Emergency Alerts in Nassau and Duval Counties?

8/12/2019 (Permalink)

Below we explain the alert systems available to you locally and provide the links that allow you to sign up. These services keep you up to date about storms and severe weather.

AlertJax: Emergency Notification System in Duval County

AlertJax/Jax Ready is an emergency notification system that will call/text residents in the event of a potential or pending emergency.  It is a free service to the citizens of Duval County.  

Additionally, AlertJax provides weather warnings based on geographical location including severe weather warnings from the National Weather Service within minutes of being issued.  If you wish to register use the link below. 

Sign up for AlertJax…


Alert Nassau: Emergency Notification System in Nassau County

Keep informed about emergency conditions and other important community news by signing up for our Emergency Alert Notification System.  This Citizen Alert system provides you with critical information quickly in a variety of situations, like when circumstances require evacuations or sheltering-in-place for your neighborhood, or create unexpected road closures.  You can receive voice-recorded alerts to your choice of home, mobile, or business phones, as well as text alerts and e-mail messages. 

Sign up for Alert Nassau…

Stay Safe From Summer Storms in Nassau County & North Jacksonville 

7/29/2019 (Permalink)

Follow these tips to stay safe during summer storms.

While spring is known for the potential of producing severe weather, the threat exists throughout the summer months as well. In fact, the potential for severe weather even increases in some areas. Hurricane season in the Atlantic begins June 1st and runs through November 30th and, in our area, it pays to be prepared.

Consider the following tips when preparing for an approaching storm.

Before the Storm

  • Build an emergency supply kit and develop a communication plan.
  • Unplug electronic equipment before the storm arrives.
  • Secure outdoor objects that could blow away or cause damage.
  • If you are outdoors, get inside a building, home or hard top vehicle (not a convertible).
  • Shutter windows and secure outside doors. If shutters are not available, close window blinds, shades or curtains.

During the Storm

  • Use your battery-operated NOAA Weather Radio for updates from local officials.
  • Avoid contact with corded phones. Cordless and cell phones are safe to use.
  • Unplug appliances and other electrical items, such as computers. Power surges from lightning can cause serious damage to these.
  • Avoid contact with electrical equipment or cords.
  • Avoid contact with plumbing. Plumbing and bathroom fixtures can conduct electricity.
  • Stay away from windows and doors.

After the Storm

  • Never drive through a flooded roadway. Turn your car around if you encounter water on the road that looks to be 6 inches or deeper. 
  • Stay away from storm-damaged areas to keep from putting yourself at risk.
  • Stay away from downed power lines and report them immediately.

While it may be difficult to prepare for the unpredictable, there are steps you can take now to help ensure you are ready when disaster strikes. One way to prepare your home or business for any type of disaster is to establish an Emergency READY Profile (ERP). Learn more about the ERP app and how it can help you. Contact SERVPRO of Fernandina Beach/Jacksonville Northeast if you need more information.

As Atlantic hurricane season begins, researchers increase forecast slightly, predict near-average 2019

6/6/2019 (Permalink)

Colorado State Hurricane Researchers have slightly upped their projection for the number of hurricanes that will impact the Atlantic this season.

June 4, 2019 - A widely followed team of forecasters has slightly upped the number of expected hurricanes this year, citing warming seas in the tropical Atlantic Ocean.

Colorado State University Hurricane Researchers are projecting a slight increase from their initial forecast issued in early April --predicting a near-average Atlanta hurricane season in 2019. They anticipate that weak El Niño conditions are likely to persist through most of the hurricane season. El Niño tends to increase upper-level westerly winds across the Caribbean into the tropical Atlantic, tearing apart hurricanes as they try to form.

The CSU Tropical Meteorology Project team is predicting 13 additional named storms during the Atlantic hurricane season, which runs from June 1 to November 30. The Atlantic had one named storm in May (Andrea), so the full seasonal forecast is for 14 named storms. Of these named storms, researchers expect six to become hurricanes and two to reach major hurricane strength with sustained winds of 111 miles per hour or greater.

Here is a link to the full article.

We at SERVPRO of Fernandina Beach/Jacksonville Northeast hope and pray that this area is not impacted by hurricanes this season, but if we are, you can rest assured that we will be available to help you restore any damages you incur.

Hurricane Preparedness Week – May 5-11 2019

5/9/2019 (Permalink)

The best time to prepare for a hurricane is before hurricane season begins on June 1.

Source: FEMA/ready.gov

Hurricanes are among nature's most powerful and destructive phenomena. On average, 12 tropical storms, 6 of which become hurricanes form over the Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea, or Gulf of Mexico during the hurricane season which runs from June 1 to November 30 each year. Over a typical 2-year period, the U.S. coastline is struck by an average of 3 hurricanes, 1 of which is classified as a major hurricane (winds of 111 mph or greater). By knowing what actions to take before the hurricane season begins, when a hurricane approaches, and when the storm is in your area, as well as what to do after a hurricane leaves your area, you can increase your chance of survival.

Here's what you can do now...
The best time to prepare for a hurricane is before hurricane season begins on June 1. It is vital to understand your home's vulnerability to storm surge, flooding, and wind. Here is your checklist of things to do BEFORE hurricane seasons begins.

  • Know your zone: Do you live near the Gulf or Atlantic Coasts? Find out if you live in a hurricane evacuation area by contacting your local government/emergency management office or by checking the evacuation site website.
  • Put Together an Emergency Kit: Put together a basic emergency. Check emergency equipment, such as flashlights, generators and storm shutters.
  • Write or review your Family Emergency Plan: Before an emergency happens, sit down with your family or close friends and decide how you will get in contact with each other, where you will go, and what you will do in an emergency. Keep a copy of this plan in your emergency supplies kit or another safe place where you can access it in the event of a disaster. Start at the Ready.Gov emergency plan webpage.
  • Review Your Insurance Policies: Review your insurance policies to ensure that you have adequate coverage for your home and personal property.
  • Understand NWS forecast products, especially the meaning of NWS watches and warnings.

If hurricanes impact the Nassau county/North Jacksonville area this year, SERVPRO of Fernandina Beach/Jacksonville Northeast will be ready to help you get your life back to normal, "Like it never even happened." Call us at 904.729.2401 

Strong Storms Impact First Coast on Friday

4/19/2019 (Permalink)

FIRST ALERT WEATHER DAY: Here's how Friday's weather could affect your plans

By: Action News Jax

Updated: 

WHAT TO EXPECT: 

  • WIND. A Wind Advisory will be in effect for the entire area from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Winds will be out of the south and southwest at 20 to 30 mph with gusts up to 40 mph.
  • HEAVY RAIN.  A squall line of heavy rain and strong storms will track west to east across our area. Timing will bring that line of potential severe weather to communities west of Hwy 301 from about 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. and east Hwy 301 towards I-95 from 1 to 5 p.m. before it moves off the coast.
  • POSSIBLE TORNADOES. In addition to heavy rain, the area will see the threat of damaging wind gusts and isolated tornadoes as this squall line passes through.
  • SUMMARY: During the day, you should expect it to be mostly cloudy, windy with heavy rain and strong storms. Tonight, expect evening showers, a partial clearing and breezy temperatures. 

Researchers Predicting Slightly Below-Average 2019 Atlantic Hurricane Season

4/5/2019 (Permalink)

The likelihood of a weak El Niño is behind researchers' predictions of a below average 2019 Atlantic hurricane season.

Source: Colorado State University Tropical Meteorology Project

Colorado State University hurricane researchers are predicting a slightly below-average Atlantic hurricane season in 2019, citing the relatively high likelihood of a weak El Niño as a primary factor.

Tropical Atlantic sea surface temperatures are currently slightly below their long-term average values and are consequently considered an inhibiting factor for 2019 Atlantic hurricane activity as well.

A weak El Niño has recently developed in the tropical Pacific. CSU anticipates that these weak El Niño conditions are likely to persist through the peak of the Atlantic hurricane season. El Niño tends to increase upper-level westerly winds across the Caribbean into the tropical Atlantic, tearing apart hurricanes as they try to form.

The tropical Atlantic is slightly cooler than normal right now. Colder-than-normal sea surface temperatures in the tropical Atlantic provide less fuel for tropical cyclone formation and intensification. They are also associated with a more stable atmosphere as well as drier air, both of which suppress organized thunderstorm activity necessary for hurricane development.

13 named storms

The CSU Tropical Meteorology Project team is predicting 13 named storms during the Atlantic hurricane season, which runs from June 1 to Nov. 30. Of those, researchers expect five to become hurricanes and two to reach major hurricane strength (Saffir/Simpson category 3-4-5) with sustained winds of 111 miles per hour or greater.

The team bases its forecasts on a statistical model, as well as a new model that uses a combination of statistical information and forecasts from a dynamical model. Both of these models are built on about 40 years of historical data and evaluating conditions including: Atlantic sea surface temperatures, sea level pressures, vertical wind shear levels (the change in wind direction and speed with height in the atmosphere), El Niño (warming of waters in the central and eastern tropical Pacific), and other factors.

So far, the 2019 hurricane season is exhibiting characteristics similar to 1969, 1987, 1991, 2002, and 2009. “1987, 1991, 2002 and 2009 had below-average Atlantic hurricane activity, while 1969 was a very active hurricane season,” said Phil Klotzbach, research scientist in the Department of Atmospheric Science and lead author of the report.

The team predicts that 2019 hurricane activity will be about 75 percent of the average season. By comparison, 2018’s hurricane activity was about 120 percent of the average season.  The 2018 season was most notable for Hurricanes Florence and Michael which devastated the Carolinas and portions of the Florida Panhandle, respectively.

The CSU team will issue forecast updates on June 4, July 2 and Aug. 6.

Expected Jacksonville Area Impacts from Hurricane Michael  

10/9/2018 (Permalink)

The Jacksonville area will experience heavy rain in multiple bands through Thursday, with the potential for 1-3" of rain, more in some spots.

Source: Action News Jax

Hurricane "Michael" continues to organize & strengthen.  Forecast to hit the Fl. Panhandle as a "major" Cat. 3 hurricane Wednesday afternoon.  This could be the most major hurricane to squarely hit the Panhandle since Ivan in 2004 which destroyed the I-10 bridge to Pensacola.

Given current forecast path - SUBJECT TO SOME CHANGES –Michael will hit between Mobile, Al. & the Big Bend of Fl. centered on the Central Panhandle, local impacts for Jacksonville, NE Fl. & SE Ga. are as follows:

* heavy rain in multiple bands through Thu. with the potential for 1-3" of rain, more in some spots.  Far more rain just offshore to the east & over NW Fl. & Panhandle into Ga. closer to what should be the center of Michael.  Looks like a relative lull in the rain Wed. due to dry slot pivoting north around the eastern side of Michael's circulation.

* breezy winds - combination of  "Michael" to the west & moderately strong high pressure to the north will result in brisk winds out of the SE increasing each day through Thu. averaging 15-25 mph with gusts 30+ mph.  Strongest winds will be at the beaches & from near Lake City to Waycross closer to Michael's center.

* isolated waterspouts &/or tornadoes, especially Tue. through Thu.

* high rip current risk at area beaches

* minor to possibly moderate flooding - especially at times of high tide - along the coast, intracoastal & St. Johns River & its tributaries due to a combination of strong/persistent onshore flow, occasional heavy rain & an astronomical boost due to the new moon phase. No significant storm surge is expected for NE Fl. & Jacksonville & SE Ga.

If you have have storm damage call SERVPRO of Fernandina Beach/Yulee at 904.729.2401.

Florida starts to feel the spin-off of Hurricane Florence

9/13/2018 (Permalink)

There is a coastal flood advisory in effect for the Jacksonville area until 8 p.m. Friday.

Source: SunSentinel

As Hurricane Florence’s path edges farther south, Florida’s Atlantic coastline is preparing for a beating.

The center of the storm is still projected to make landfall in the Carolinas, but its effects on Florida are likely to increase, especially if it stalls along the coast before moving ashore.

Florence is expected to stay north of Florida, which will keep heavy rains away from the state, and it should stay far enough away that lessens the effect of wind, too.

In Jacksonville, the National Weather Service predicts the area will see winds between 15 mph and 30 mph. There’s a 20 percent chance or less that portions of Northern and Central Florida will experience tropical storm force winds of 39 mph or more.

There is a coastal flood advisory in effect for the Jacksonville area until 8 p.m. Friday. That is due to a combination of the higher seas caused by Florence and the seasonal king tides now taking place.

Hurricane Florence Now Category 3 – Expected Jacksonville Area Impacts

9/10/2018 (Permalink)

The entire East Coast is on alert as Hurricane Florence moves steadily in our direction.

Source: Action News Jax

MONDAY 11 A.M. | Florence has regained strengthen and is now a category 3 hurricane. 

JACKSONVILLE & VICINITY - FLORENCE IMPACTS: An increasing easterly swell at our beaches from distant Florence which will include a heightened rip current risk through Tuesday. Thereafter - primary impacts look to be a breeze & very rough seas/surf & rip currents AS LONG AS FLORENCE STAYS NORTH & EAST OF JACKSONVILLE - stay up to date on the latest & potentially changeable forecasts. In other words, on the forecast track, Florence locally will primarily effect the beaches & ocean.  All boaters should stay in port beginning Wed.

As for the big picture, Hurricane Florence appears to be taking aim at the largest U.S. Marine Corps base on the East Coast.

Camp Lejeune has an extensive beachfront about 50 miles northeast of Wilmington and it's well within the National Hurricane Center's forecast "cone."

The hurricane's path is still far from certain Monday. The rapidly intensifying storm could strike a direct and dangerous blow anywhere from the Carolinas to the Mid-Atlantic region later this week, possibly as a fearsome category 4.

Since a recurve looks very unlikely, major to severe impacts can be expected on the South Carolina and North Carolina coasts.

As for the forecast models, there was a notable shift north over the weekend, but seemingly a recent stabilization pointing to the Carolinas. This could be because of the aircraft analysis that was ingested into the computer models Sat./Sunday. 

Virtually all reliable global models are -- for now -- not far from Myrtle Beach. The UKMET model has shown the greatest shift north and is even north of the European and GFS models.

Safest Place in your Home to be During a Hurricane

8/30/2018 (Permalink)

Article Source: Act for Libraries… http://www.actforlibraries.org/safest-place-in-your-home-to-be-during-a-hurricane-3/

Hurricane season begins on June 1st and lasts until November 30th. For those five months, people who live in any area where hurricanes pose any kind of threat, regardless of whether it is a direct threat or the threat from storm related feeder bands and other problems, finding a safe place to stay while at home is an important consideration. Most homes in hurricane prone areas don’t have basements, but a basement might not be the safest place, especially if there is any possibility of flooding in that basement. If you live in an area where you may be subject to a direct or indirect hit from a hurricane, part of your hurricane readiness preparations should involve finding a safe and secure place in your home to stay if you don’t have to evacuate.

In most places, a mandatory hurricane evacuation order won’t be issued unless there is a threat of a category three hurricane or worse. For that reason, many people will opt to stay at home rather than head to a shelter for minimal to moderate hurricanes. That being said, as long as precautions are taken to batten down the hatches and secure the home to the greatest possible extent, unless you live in a very low lying area where flooding from storm surges will flood your home, you can create a safe haven in which you and your family can gather to wait out the storm. 

Avoid staying in any room where there are windows or other things that become projectiles when the windows break because of the intensity of the wind. Avoid staying on an upper floor because you could be seriously hurt if the roof of your house was to collapse. A collapsed roof isn’t an uncommon occurrence during the hurricane season.

What to look for when considering a safe place in your home…

You should also go to a windowless place on the interior of your home. The strength of winds can cause windows to break and you don’t want to be in a place where you could be hit by flying glass or other debris. You should close blinds, curtains or drapes on all windows and don’t open them until you are sure that the storm has passed. Avoid places that may be prone to flooding. 

WHERE TO GO – 

*A windowless interior bathroom –

A windowless bathroom that is away from exterior walls can be a good place because there will be plumbing pipes that can provide additional protection besides the heavy walls. Moreover, this is the place that weather authorities often recommend that people go to during tornado warnings – especially when there is no basement.

*An interior closet 

A closet can also be a good place to go for protection when you need to wait out a hurricane. If you have a large walk-in closet, gather blankets and pillows, plenty of non-perishable food, hand sanitizer, napkins, paper plates and plastic utensils, plenty of water and flashlights, batteries, a battery powered radio and your cell phone. A weather radio can be very handy at a time like this as well.

*A windowless hallway –

If you don’t have a bathroom or a bedroom or other closet that is not on an outside wall or that doesn’t have windows, look for a hallway on the interior of your home. You want to be in a place where there are no windows and where you can’t be hurt if a roof or outside wall was to collapse. 

*Under a stairwell –

If you have a two story home, you may find that the safest place, other than an interior room may be a stairwell, provided it isn’t too close to windows or a door. A closet or alcove under a staircase can be a great place to go for safety during a home. Bring in plenty of pillows, blankets and a mattress if one will fit, because you can always use a mattress to cover yourself and your family as a means of protection from flying objects. 

*Creating an in-home storm shelter  –

Some people may choose to spend the money to have a place in their home reinforced so that it is more secure and offers greater safety from both hurricanes and tornadoes. These reinforced places are designed to withstand strong winds and flying debris, allowing you to be safer than you would otherwise. These are basically an indoor equivalent to the old outdoor storm or bomb shelters. You might not want to be in an underground place if flooding is a likely possibility. 

Most of all, when staying in your home during a hurricane, you need to exercise many of the same precautions that are used for tornado warnings. Have mattresses on hand so that you can use them both to sleep on and to cover yourself with if the need for protective cover should arise. You may also want to have blankets and pillows. Be sure you have plenty of water and a hurricane readiness kit that is filled with non-perishable foods, medications that people may need, batteries, flashlights or battery powered lanterns, a NOAA weather or other radio and things to keep people entertained such as cards or board games.

With a hurricane, don’t be fooled by what may seem like a lull because that may merely be the eye of the storm and the worst is yet to come. Remain indoors until you hear something on the radio that advises you that it is safe to go outside. When you do venture out, be on the lookout for downed power lines, broken windows and other debris that can inflict injury, and never touch a power line because it is probably still live.

Above all, be sure to heed all warnings and evacuation notices.

If you have storm damage, call SERVPRO of Fernandina Beach/Yulee at 904.729.2401.

Hurricane Preparedness: Check Out the FEMA App  

7/25/2018 (Permalink)

The FEMA app is available to download for free for iOS and Android at the Apple Store and on Google.

We are well into Hurricane Season in North Florida and thought it would be a good time to introduce you to the FEMA App.

The FEMA App provides timely alerts and useful information to help you and your loved ones stay safe before, during and after disasters. You can receive fast and reliable notifications about severe weather for up to five locations nationwide. This simple and easy-to-use resource also provides safety information, emergency preparedness tips, and disaster assistance. In the midst of an emergency, the app can give you directions to open shelters nearby, help you locate someone to talk to at a Disaster Recovery Center, and let you share images of damage and recovery efforts to help first responders and emergency managers.

Features 
• Receive real-time alerts from the U.S. National Weather Service
• Monitor severe weather for up to five locations nationwide
• Know what to do before, during, and after disasters, including flooding, fires, hurricanes, snowstorms, tornadoes, volcanoes, and more
• Prepare for disasters with an emergency kit checklist, emergency family plan, and reminders
• Locate open emergency shelters in your area
• Locate Disaster Recovery Centers near you where you can talk to a FEMA representative in person
• Connect with FEMA to apply for disaster assistance online
• Upload and share disaster photos with our Disaster Reporter
• Toggle between English and Spanish
• Follow the FEMA blog to learn about the work FEMA does across the United States

STAY SAFE & INFORMED
Receive notifications about severe weather for the locations that matter to you – where your loved ones live, where you travel to, where your team plays, where you vacation. The FEMA App is perfect for emergency managers, weather junkies, property owners, businesses, non-profit organizations, outdoorsy types, travelers, commuters, vacationers, empty-nesters, coastal residents, islanders, and anyone interested in staying safe and informed.

The app is available to download for free for iOS and Android at the Apple Store and on Google.

If you suffer water damage as the result of a storm, please call SERVPRO Fernandina Beach/Yulee at 904.729.2401.

Hurricane Watches & Warnings

6/18/2018 (Permalink)

Stay abreast of weather alerts during Hurricane Season!

The National Weather Service (NWS), part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), issues alerts when weather conditions make hurricanes more likely. Know the terms used to describe changing hurricane conditions and be prepared to take appropriate action.

Tropical Storm or Hurricane Advisory– The NWS issues an Advisory when it expects conditions to cause significant inconveniences that may be hazardous. If caution is used, these situations should not be life-threatening.

Tropical Storm or Hurricane Watch– The NWS issues a Watch when a tropical storm or hurricane is possible within 48 hours. Tune in to NOAA Weather Radio All Hazards local radio, TV, or other news sources for more information. Monitor alerts, check your emergency supplies, and gather any items you may need if you lose power.

Tropical Storm or Hurricane Warning– The NWS issues a Warning when it expects a tropical storm or hurricane within 36 hours. A hurricane warning means hurricane conditions are expected in an area. A warning is issued 36 hours before tropical storm–force winds are expected. During a Warning, complete your storm preparations, and immediately leave the threatened area if directed to do so by local officials.

The best way to stay safe is to keep abreast of changing conditions and follow evacuation orders if these are issued.

Are You Storm-Ready?

6/11/2018 (Permalink)

Hurricane season started officially on June 1st and we'll soon be moving into peak season. Make your preparations now!

Storm season is upon us. Now is the time to get prepared. Here are some questions that will help you determine whether you are ready for hurricane season

  1. Are you aware of your local hazards, and your risk exposure?
  2. Have you subscribed to local alerts? 
  3. Have you created and tested a family emergency plan?
  4. Are you properly insured? 
  5. Are you saving money for emergencies, so that you can purchase emergency food and water, pay insurance deductibles, and miss a paycheck? 
  6. Have you been trained, and do you periodically practice how you and your family will respond in times of disaster, until the help arrives?
  7. Have you stored/updated emergency supplies, and enough food and water to last at least 72 hours at your home?
  8. Have you backed up computer files and data and made copies of important documents? 
  9. Do you know how to shut off the water & gas in your home?
  10. Are you prepared to check on your neighbors? 

We've been hit hard with Hurricanes Matthew and Irma over the last two years, and we all hope the storms will steer clear of us this year. If you suffer storm-related damage to your home or property, call SERVPRO of Fernandina Beach/Yulee at 904-729-2401. We'll be there to help 24/7.

Flood Tips for Businesses

4/24/2018 (Permalink)

If your business experiences flooding, call the restoration experts at SERVPRO of Fernandina Beach/Yulee at 904.729.2401!

Floods rank as one of the most common and widespread natural disasters in the United States. Whether you live near a coastline, along city streets, in the mountains, near a river or even in the desert, there is a potential for suffering flood damage. In fact, nearly 25% of last year’s claims paid by the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) were for policies in moderate to low-risk communities. On average, floods cost $6 billion in annual losses in the U.S. Flooding can also result from plumbing failures, frozen pipes and damaged structures. Flood damage can affect your business operation in a variety of ways and can range in size from being isolated to a single room to entire floors being fully submerged.

Knowing how to prepare and deal with potential flooding in advance can affect how much of your property can be restored and how much has to be replaced. Below are prevention, mitigation and restoration tips to follow until help arrives:

Flood Preparation Tips:

  •  Determine if your property is in a flood plain.
  •  In any emergency, always listen to the instructions given by local emergency management officials.
  •  Carefully assess how your company functions, both internally and externally, to determine which staff, materials, procedures and equipment are absolutely necessary to keep the business operating.
  •  Plan what you will do if your building, plant or store is not accessible. This type of planning is often referred to as a continuity of operations plan, or COOP, and includes all facets of your business.
  •  Plan for payroll continuity.
  •  Review your emergency plans annually. Just as your business changes over time, so do your preparedness needs. When you hire new employees or when there are changes in how your company functions, you should update your plans and inform your people.
  •  Visit:http://www.ready.gov/america/local/index.htmlfor a comprehensive plan and to learn about emergency plans.

When Storms or Flooding Occur in Fernandina Beach or North Jax, SERVPRO is ready!

4/18/2018 (Permalink)

If you have storm or flood damage, call SERVPRO of Fernandina Beach/Yulee at 904.729.2401!

SERVPRO of Fernandina Beach/Yulee specializes in storm and flood damage restoration.  Our crews are highly trained and we use specialized equipment to restore your property to its pre-storm condition.

Faster Response

Since we are locally owned and operated, we are able to respond quicker with the right resources, which is extremely important. A fast response lessens the damage, limits further damage, and reduces the restoration cost.

Resources to Handle Floods and Storms

When storms hit our area, we can scale our resources to handle a large storm or flooding disaster. We can access equipment and personnel from a network of 1,650 Franchises across the country and elite Disaster Recovery Teams that are strategically located throughout the United States.

Have Storm or Flood Damage? Call Us Today at 904.729.2401

It's going to be another busy, above average hurricane season meteorologists say

4/10/2018 (Permalink)

Source: USA Today

After a nightmarish 2017 hurricane season featuring monsters such as Harvey, Irma and Maria, many in the U.S. are hoping for a quieter year. A top forecasting group says that won't be the case.

Meteorologist Phil Klotzbach and other experts from Colorado State University — regarded as the nation's top seasonal hurricane forecasters — predict 14 named tropical storms, of which seven will become hurricanes. Both numbers are above the average of 12 and six, respectively.

A tropical storm becomes a hurricane when its wind speed reaches 74 mph. 

Of the seven predicted hurricanes, three are expected to spin into major hurricanes — category 3, 4 or 5 — with sustained wind speeds of 111 mph or greater. The group said there's a slightly above-average chance for major hurricanes to make landfall along the U.S. coastline. Klotzbach put the chance of a major hurricane strike at 63%. 

The Atlantic hurricane season runs from June 1 to Nov. 30, though storms sometimes form outside those dates.

Colorado State's prediction in 2017 was low: Last year, the team predicted 11 tropical storms would form, of which 4 would become hurricanes. In all, 17 tropical storms developed and 10 strengthened into hurricanes.

One of the major determining factors in hurricane forecasting is whether the U.S. is in an El Niño or La Niña climate pattern, he said.

El Niño is a natural warming of tropical Pacific Ocean water, which tends to suppress the development of Atlantic hurricanes. Its opposite, La Niña, marked by cooler ocean water, tends to increase hurricanes in the Atlantic.

Klotzbach said we're now in a weak La Niña event, which appears likely to diminish over the next several months. At this point, a significant El Niño is not anticipated for the summer or fall, he added.

The other big question mark in this season's predictions are how warm sea-surface temperatures will be in the tropical and far North Atlantic Ocean during the peak of the Atlantic hurricane season, according to the forecast. 

Hurricanes need the fuel of warm ocean water to develop and strengthen. 

AccuWeather released its hurricane forecast for the upcoming season earlier this week, predicting 12-15 named storms would form, of which six to eight will be hurricanes. The firm said three to four are likely to hit the U.S.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration will issue its forecast in May.

Nassau County/North Jax Residents: Make An Emergency Plan

4/10/2018 (Permalink)

Knowing how to contact each other in the event of an emergency is a key part of your emergency plan.

Source: Department of Homeland Security

https://www.ready.gov/make-a-plan

Make an emergency plan today. Your family may not be together if a disaster strikes, so it is important to know which types of disasters could affect your area.  Storms most commonly affect his area. Know how you’ll contact one another and reconnect if separated. Establish a family meeting place that’s familiar and easy to find.

Step 1: Put together a plan by discussing these 4 questions with your family, friends, or household to start your emergency plan.

  1. How will I receive emergency alerts and warnings?
  2. What is my shelter plan?
  3. What is my evacuation route?
  4. What is my family/household communication plan?

Step 2:  Consider specific needs in your household.

As you prepare your plan tailor your plans and supplies to your specific daily living needs and responsibilities. Discuss your needs and responsibilities and how people in the network can assist each other with communication, care of children, business, pets, or specific needs like the operation of durable medical equipment. Create your own personal network for specific areas where you need assistance.  Keep in mind some these factors when developing your plan:

  • Different ages of members within your household
  • Responsibilities for assisting others
  • Locations frequented
  • Dietary needs
  • Medical needs including prescriptions and equipment
  • Disabilities or access and functional needs including devices and equipment
  • Languages spoken
  • Cultural and religious considerations
  • Pets or service animals
  • Households with school-aged children

Step 3: Fill out a Family Emergency Plan

Download and fill out a family emergency plan or use them as a guide to create your own.

Step 4: Practice your plan with your family/household

If storms impact your home or property, call SERVPRO of Fernandina Beach/Yulee at 904.729.2401. We’ll treat your family with compassion and your property with respect.

Hurricane Irma Upgraded to Category 5; Florida Prepares

9/5/2017 (Permalink)

Now is the time for North Floridians to prepare for Hurricane IRMA.

Hurricane Irma was upgraded to a dangerous Category 5 storm early Tuesday as it churned through the Atlantic Ocean. Tuesday’s 7:45 a.m. advisory revealed that Irma’s sustained wind strength had increased to 175 mph.

On Monday, Florida Gov. Rick Scott declared a state of emergency ahead of Hurricane Irma making landfall. Wednesday the storm is expected to be near Puerto Rico and by Friday it will be near Cuba. 

In the Jacksonville area, there will be an increasing threat of dangerous rip currents for several days.

Many hazards include: Elevated surf, coastal flooding, and beach erosion toward the end of the week. There is also a threat of very heavy rainfall through Northeast Florida this weekend.(7-day forecast)

The storm is then expected to make a quick turn to the north early Sunday morning, but it is still unknown at this time what that track will look like.

Now is the time to prepare your emergency kits.

SERVPRO Fernandina Beach/Yulee/North Jax will be available to help if your property suffers flooding. Call us at 904.729.2401.

Nassau County & North Jax: Do you have an emergency kit?

8/30/2017 (Permalink)

As we have seen in Houston, flooding can happen fast in many environments. September is National Preparedness Month. The American Red Cross recommends having the following list of items packed and ready to go in the event of an evacuation due to flooding.

  • Water--3+ day supply; one gallon per person per day
  • Food—3+ day supply of non-perishable, easy-to-prepare food
  • Flashlight
  • Battery-powered or hand-crank radio (NOAA Weather Radio if possible)
  • Extra batteries
  • First Aid Kit
  • Medications (7 day supply) and medical items (hearing aids with extra batteries, glasses, contacts, cane)
  • Multi-purpose tool
  • Sanitation/personal hygiene items
  • Copies of personal documents (medication list and pertinent medical information, deed/lease to home, birth certificates, insurance policies)
  • Cell phone with chargers
  • Family and emergency contact information
  • Extra cash
  • Emergency blanket
  • Map(s) of the area
  • Baby supplies (bottles, formula, baby food, diapers)
  • Pet supplies (collar, leash, ID, food, carrier, bowl)
  • Tools/Supplies for securing your home
  • Extra set of car keys and house keys
  • Extra clothing, hat, and sturdy shoes
  • Rain gear
  • Insect repellent
  • Camera for photos of damage

If you suffer flooding or water intrusion in your home, call the water restoration experts at SERVPRO Fernandina Beach/Yulee/North Jacksonville at 904-729-2401.

Hurricane Information

8/16/2017 (Permalink)

From tropical storm to hurricane. These storms can bring forth a tremendous amount of damage in their wake. Pictured is a view of Hurricane Katrina.

Hurricanes

     Hurricanes are giant, spiraling tropical storms that can pack wind speeds of over 160 miles (257 kilometers) an hour and unleash more than 2.4 trillion gallons (9 trillion liters) of rain a day. These same tropical storms are known as cyclones in the northern Indian Ocean and Bay of Bengal, and as typhoons in the western Pacific Ocean. The Atlantic Ocean’s hurricane season peaks from mid-August to late October and averages five to six hurricanes per year.

A Damaging Storm

These storms bring destruction ashore in many different ways. When a hurricane makes landfall, it often produces a devastating storm surge that can reach 20 feet (6 meters) high and extend nearly 100 miles (161 kilometers). Ninety percent of all hurricane deaths result from storm surges.

A hurricane’s high winds are also destructive and may spawn tornadoes. Torrential rains cause further damage by spawning floods and landslides, which may occur many miles inland.

The best defense against a hurricane is an accurate forecast that gives people time to get out of its way. The National Hurricane Center issues hurricane watches for storms that may endanger communities, and hurricane warnings for storms that will make landfall within 24 hours.

Flood Clean Up Tips For Homeowners

6/12/2017 (Permalink)

Severe thunderstorms can lead to flash flooding. Call SERVPRO Fernandina Beach/Yulee/North Jacksonville at 904-729-2401 if you have storm damage.

Rising water is one of the most frightening problems that a homeowner may face, and the resulting flood clean-up is both costly and time-consuming. It is a scary prospect watching floodwaters creep slowly toward the home. If high water makes an incursion, severe damage and a horrible clutter of muck, debris, and germs may follow. Acting quickly after the water recedes can decrease the damage and perhaps make some possessions and furniture salvageable. Even carpet may be restorable, depending on the extent and the type of the flooding. Unfortunately, many electronics exposed to the water are typically considered a loss. Don’t take water damage lightly. Even if the area only had an inch of water, or is just damp, it can become the ideal situation for mold growth within days. Mold may contaminate walls, carpet, furniture, and flooring. It can lead to breathing issues including asthma, and severe illness.

Below are some useful flood clean-up tips for home and business owners. If any mold is suspected, we recommended using the services of an IICRC-certified mold remediation specialist such as SERVPRO of Fernandina Beach/Yulee/North Jacksonville rather than attempting clean-up yourself.

Clean Up Tips for Homeowners

  • Before going into the house to begin flood clean-up, check for downed power lines, gas leaks, foundation cracks, or other obvious problems.
  • If power lines are down near the home, avoid puddles or standing water. Calling on professional help is the best way to avoid injury or electrocution.  
  • Be on the lookout for wild animals, including snakes. Floodwaters tend to uproot them from their natural areas, and it is possible that they have entered the home or are in the general vicinity.
  • While cleaning up, wear protective gear such as boots and rubber gloves.
  • Waterlogged cleaning products, paint, batteries, and fuel are contaminated and considered hazardous. Learn more about disposal of these items.
  • Discard food items and drinking water if it has come into contact with the flood waters. This includes canned goods and bottled water. Follow the maxim: When in doubt, throw it out!

SERVPRO Fernandina Beach/Yulee/North Jacksonville has the experience and equipment to restore your property. Call us at 904-729-2401 if you experience storm-related damage. 

Fewer Hurricanes Expected in 2017 Atlantic Hurricane Season  

5/30/2017 (Permalink)

If a hurricane strikes this season, SERVPRO of Fernandina Beach/Yulee/North Jacksonville will be there to help 24/7.

The coming hurricane season could be slightly below the average of 12 a year, according to Colorado State University forecasters.

The university's annual Department of Atmospheric Science pre-season forecast is based on long-range weather and climate conditions.

Currently, those are showing "a below-average probability of major hurricanes making landfall along the United States coastline and in the Caribbean," researchers Philip Klotzbach and Michael Bell said in a recent report.

The center is predicting 11 named storms, including two major hurricanes. All together, the center expects there will be 50 days during which storms are active.

The probability of a direct hit on the East Coast and Florida is 24 percent. The historical average is 30 percent. The probability of a major hurricane coming ashore anywhere in the United States is 42 percent, compared to the historical average of 52 percent, according to the report.

University forecasters predict 2017 hurricane activity will be about 85 percent of the average season of 12 storms. Last year's was 135 percent of the average season.

Last year, the center correctly predicted an above-average Atlantic hurricane season, which included historic Hurricane Matthew. Its strongest winds came within 5 miles of the First Coast. The brunt of that storm hit elsewhere, particularly in South Georgia and the Carolinas.

The university's forecasts have been correct during 28 of the 35 years it has been predicting whether a season will be above or below normal.

National Hurricane Center officials caution the public that it only takes one hurricane to severely damage an area and forecasters can't say where this season's tropical storms and hurricane might go.

"They (coastal residents) should prepare," Koltzbach said.

Last year, SERVPRO Fernandina Beach/Yulee/North Jacksonville helped many local residents recover from damages related to Hurricane Matthew. If a hurricane strikes this year, call us at 904-729-2401 and we’ll be there to help 24/7.

Where to Go in the Event of a Tornado, Hurricane, or Severe Storm in Nassau County  

5/22/2017 (Permalink)

NOTE: Not all shelters are opened for every emergency. Call 904-548-0900 before you go.

Following is a list of Nassau County Emergency Public Shelter Locations, along with other helpful information.


Please Note:


-NOT ALL SHELTERS WILL BE OPENED FOR EVERY EMERGENCY!
Check with Emergency Management before you go - call 904-548-0900.

-If you have no way to get to a public shelter, register for transportation assistance annually, before June 1st.  

-If you use medical equipment that requires electricity, such as an oxygen concentrator, and intend to go to a public shelter, you must register for space in the Special Medical Needs Shelter annually, before June 1st.

These Sites Are Approved Wind-Rated Emergency Shelters:

General Population Shelters (no pets)


Bryceville Elementary School
6504 Church Ave 
Hilliard, FL  32045 
View Map

Callahan Intermediate School
34586 Ball Park Rd 
Callahan, FL  32011 
View Map

Hilliard Elementary School
27568 Ohio St 
Hilliard, FL 32045 
View Map

West Nassau High School 
(General Population) 
1 Warrior Dr. 
Callahan, FL 32011 
View Map

Yulee High School 
85375 Miner Rd. 
Yulee, FL 32097 
View Map

Yulee Middle School 
85439 Miner Rd. 
Yulee, FL 32097 
View Map


Pet-Friendly Public Shelters
Requires secure crate/cage, bowls, food supply, and current vaccinations


Callahan Middle School
450121 Old Dixie Hwy 
Callahan, FL  32011 
View Map

Yulee Elementary School 
86063 Felmore Rd 
Yulee, FL  32097 
View Map


Special Medical Needs Shelter
Requires Annual Registration before Hurricane Season (by June 1st)


Hilliard Middle-Senior High School 
1 Flashes Ave 
Hilliard, FL  32045 
View Map 


 

Prepare for Storm Season: Ten Tips You Should Know

4/6/2017 (Permalink)

It's almost that time of year again.  We are enjoying early spring, but late spring ushers in storm season.  Here in the Southeast, we are very vulnerable to violent weather and hurricanes.  So it pays to make sure you’re prepared before the weather arrives.  Here are 10 steps to take before storm season:



  • Locate and agree on a safe room. Plan to find the lowest place in the house, without windows.  Usually this is the basement or an interior closet or storeroom.  Meet as a family and agree to the plan to meet there in case of emergency.  Be sure that each family member has a plan for shelter away from home in case of a storm that doesn’t allow everyone to get home.

  • Be sure to keep supplies on hand in or near the safe room.  These should include:  water, a water purification kit, non-perishable snacks/food, blankets and pillows, clothing, first aid, medical equipment for special-needs family members, pre-moistened towelettes, hand sanitizer, zip-lock plastic bags, disposable eating ware, duct tape, necessary toiletries, flashlights with fresh batteries, radio, cell phone with charged batteries, entertainment items, and pet care items. You may want a battery-operated laptop with a cellular modem to be able to connect with email and Internet.

  • Evacuation plan. Have a plan if you will be required to evacuate due to incoming weather.  Don’t risk it--get out if an evacuation order comes.  Know the escape routes, plan for pets, have the car full of gas, etc. Be sure you have identification, medication, medical paperwork, insurance information, food, eyeglasses, money, credit cards, etc. with you when you evacuate.

  • Plan for pets.  Make sure you know where the family pets are at all times and who is responsible for their care before and during the storm.  Develop a plan for their care in case of evacuation.

  • A stand-by generator rapidly is becoming a necessary home appliance. Heating/cooling, cooking, communication, medical gear, etc. all are dependent on electric supply. A permanent stand-by generator fueled by natural or propane gas with automatic transfer switch is best. Portable gas or diesel-powered generators are ok for short-term uses but less reliable and more dangerous.  Be sure to follow proper venting procedures to avoid carbon monoxide poisoning.

  • Check insurance. Make sure your home and auto insurance is up to date and that you’re covered in case of storm damage.

  • Trim the trees. Broken tree limbs hitting power lines or houses can cause a lot of damage. The best defense is pruning.  Taking the weight off the top of trees allows the roots to withstand higher winds and prevent damage.

  • Install the shutters. New building codes in hurricane-prone areas require shutters or ballistic glass to be installed in homes.  But increasingly homeowners around the country are installing shutters that can be deployed electronically or manually in case of storms.  You also can use pre-cut plywood to cover windows.

  • Collect all potential projectiles.  Clear the yard and patio of everything not attached:  lawn furniture, bird feeders, wind chimes, patio equipment, toys, etc. so they don’t become airborne projectiles.

  • Secure valuables. Move valuables and irreplaceable photos to a safe deposit box to prevent loss.  Videotape the contents of your home, garage, and landscaping, and store the video in the box. 


 


Planning is the key to minimizing damage and preventing injuries or loss of life in storms.  So get ahead of the season, and be prepared.


 


If you suffer storm damage, call SERVPRO Fernandina Beach/Yulee/North Jacksonville at 904-729-2401 any time day or night. We’ll respond quickly and make it “Like it never even happened.”


 

Restoring A Fernandina Beach Commercial Property After Hurricane Matthew

3/30/2017 (Permalink)

Hurricane Events Present Unique Challenges

Storm and water damage events at Fernandina commercial properties are often complex with numerous issues that require a knowledgeable and flexible response. In this case, the storm had caused water penetration of both the roof and the walls of this building, and the professionals at SERVPRO Fernandina Beach/Yulee/North Jacksonville had to balance this large job with numerous others in the area at the time. We also called in other SERVPRO franchises nearby so that we could respond quickly to all of the affected homes and businesses.


 


Restoring Commercial Properties After Hurricanes Presents Unique Challenges


Our professionals are trained to be mindful of legal and environmental concerns and strive to fully restore the damaged area while working within your budgetary constraints. We understand that every hour spent cleaning up is an hour of lost revenue and productivity. So when an emergency situation arises in your business, give us a call at 904-729-2401 and we’ll be there fast with the help you need.


 


About SERVPRO of Fernandina Beach/Yulee/North Jacksonville


SERVPRO of Fernandina Beach/Yulee/North Jacksonville specializes in the cleanup and restoration of commercial and residential property after a water damage event. Our staff is highly trained in property damage restoration. From initial and ongoing training at SERVPRO’s corporate training facility to regular IICRC-industry certification, our staff is equipped with the knowledge to restore your property.

When Storm or Floods hit Fernandina Beach/Yulee/North Jax, SERVPRO is ready!

3/21/2017 (Permalink)

Our highly trained crews are ready to respond 24/7 to storm or flood damage in Fernandina Beach/Yulee/North Jax.

SERVPRO of Fernandina Beach/Yulee/North Jax specializes in storm and flood damage restoration. Our crews are highly trained and we use specialized equipment to restore your property to its pre-storm condition.


Faster Response
Since we are locally owned and operated, we are able to respond quicker with the right resources, which is extremely important. A fast response lessens the damage, limits further damage, and reduces the restoration cost.


Resources to Handle Floods and Storms
When storms hit Fernandina Beach/Yulee/North Jax, we can scale our resources to handle a large storm or flooding disaster. We can access equipment and personnel from a network of 1,650 Franchises across the country and elite Disaster Recovery Teams that are strategically located throughout the United States.


Have Storm or Flood Damage? Call Us Today 904-729-2401.

Hurricane Information

2/7/2017 (Permalink)

From tropical storm to hurricanes. These storms can bring forth a tremendous amount of damage in their wake. Pictured is a view of Hurricane Katrina.

   Hurricanes

     Hurricanes are giant, spiraling tropical storms that can pack wind speeds of over 160 miles (257 kilometers) an hour and unleash more than 2.4 trillion gallons (9 trillion liters) of rain a day. These same tropical storms are known as cyclones in the northern Indian Ocean and Bay of Bengal, and as typhoons in the western Pacific Ocean. The Atlantic Ocean’s hurricane season peaks from mid-August to late October and averages five to six hurricanes per year.

A Damaging Storm

These storms bring destruction ashore in many different ways. When a hurricane makes landfall, it often produces a devastating storm surge that can reach 20 feet (6 meters) high and extend nearly 100 miles (161 kilometers). Ninety percent of all hurricane deaths result from storm surges.

A hurricane’s high winds are also destructive and may spawn tornadoes. Torrential rains cause further damage by spawning floods and landslides, which may occur many miles inland.

The best defense against a hurricane is an accurate forecast that gives people time to get out of its way. The National Hurricane Center issues hurricane watches for storms that may endanger communities, and hurricane warnings for storms that will make landfall within 24 hours.

Storm Damage Prevention Awareness

6/23/2014 (Permalink)

Follow these tips to prevent damage to your home in the event of a storm.

Follow These Tips For Storm Damage Prevention

 Powerful natural phenomena such as thunderstorms and tornados often strike with little warning and are capable of leaving behind complete devastation. Hurricanes give more warning but may be even more damaging. By investing time in preventative measures, your risk of experiencing storm damage is greatly decreased.

 Keep Trees Trimmed

     There is no doubt trees can cause damage and be damaged in storms. However, appropriately placed and maintained trees can help reduce damage to structures in storms by deflecting wind, and reduce damage to trees. Appropriate actions includes proper placement and planting, and structural pruning prior to the storm. Species selection can also be somewhat helpful in avoiding some damage. Actions in the weeks and years following a strong storm can help bring damaged trees back to health.

  • Trim tree limbs away from your home's roof on a regular basis. Roof damage associated with storms is often caused by overgrown trees. Regular trimming reduces the chances of fallen limbs harming your home or vehicle.
  •  Put Away Movable Objects

  • Store light and movable items such as outdoor furniture and lawn decorations. These items can be swept up by strong winds and thrown at doors, windows and vehicles.
  •  Manage Leaks

  • Repair all leaks. Even the smallest of untreated leaks can quickly grow into a deluge during heavy rains and cause an unlimited amount of damage to a home. All leaks should be properly repaired immediately.
  •  Protect Your Vehicle

  • Park your vehicle under an awning or in a garage. Vehicles are always at a very high risk of suffering storm damage because they usually are parked outside. If protected parking is unavailable, park far away from trees, telephone poles and objects at risk of falling or moving.